Where really is home?

Spurs

Cause they say home is where your heart is set in stone
Is where you go when you’re alone
Is where you go to rest your bones
It’s not just where you lay your head
It’s not just where you make your bed
As long as we’re together, does it matter where we go?
Home home home home home home home home

– Gabrielle Palin

“Home” is the one and only destination common to everyone. Wherever we are, wherever we go, we all want to end up at home.

But where is home?

Where thou art, that is home.” – Emily Dickinson

I have chosen to believe that “home” is that place where your heart is set to. It’s that one place you don’t even feel the tiniest bit of unrest. Home is someplace that is real.

Here is some of what Mark Matousek said in his post Where Is Home? after coming in contact with “the homeless”:

“I had never considered that home meant more than a physical structure, a door to lock, a stable location, nor that home was as much a metaphor as it was an architectural container. Not before interviewing a wide range of “the homeless,” several of them philosophers in their own right, did I begin to explore the spiritual meaning of home and its impact on everyday human life, regardless of whether one had a permanent address or not.

I came to understand that homelessness is a state of mind that many of us have experienced, in fact, more often than we care to admit. In times of transition and struggle, during intervals of heartache, confusion, and disappointment, it is common for all of us to have feelings of dislocation, uprooting, and abandonment, the sense of being alone in the universe without a place to call one’s own — literally or figuratively. In these “homeless” times, we come to learn that home means more than four walls and a ceiling. Home is where we find our balance, the pivoting point that connects us to the earth. Sociologists studying the homeless have examined this phenomenon. As one scientist writes, “It is of more than semantic significance that we call these people ‘homeless’ instead of ‘houseless’ or ‘shelterless.’ Home has an existential importance that reflects our discomfort at being on the earth in the first place.”

Viewed in this way, the question of home takes on a whole new meaning. Home is not only where we hang our hat but also where we find our heart. In addition to providing shelter from the storms of weather, home offers refuge in the spiritual sense, a protected place in which to thrive; this is why Buddhists describe dharma initiation as “taking refuge” in the teachings. The place we call home is where we find community and the experience of belonging. That is why we may feel more at home with a group of like-minded strangers than we do with biological family. To belong, to fit in, to feel comfortable enough to be ourselves; to be seen and heard without judgment; to know that we will be taken care of in times of need, unconditionally; these are our deepest human longings. Next to these nurturing aspects of home, the material comforts that many of us focus on — the perfect decor, the two-car garage, the central A/C and the sub-zero fridge — matter very little to the heart.

The heart craves connection, acceptance, belonging, a nest to come home to, a place to just be; a sanctuary where we can rest without fear of rejection, aggression, or prejudice.”

 

Remember, no matter what you do, you’ll always find your way back home if you want to.

But where is your home?

Have a blessed week!

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